Report: Nissan Maxima Dead in 2023

report nissan maxima dead in 2023


Surprising exactly no one, Nissan has confirmed to a California-based automotive outlet that the Nissan Maxima will shuffle off this mortal coil in about a year’s time in mid-2023. While this news isn’t unexpected, it is still a bit sad for those of us who remember when the Maxima lived up to its name as a Four-Door Sports Car.




Dan Passe, spox for Nissan, confirmed these details to The Car Connection earlier today.

"The current-generation Maxima will end production in the middle of 2023," he explained to the site. Speculation exists about the nameplate returning in some form as an EV but it’s safe to say that, if the model does return, it won’t look anything like the Maxima of old.


Those of you with long memories will recall the days when the 4DSC moniker was loudly touted by Nissan and applied to a car that mostly had the mouth to match its trousers. The third-gen car, a handsome and squared-off thing, was offered with a 24-valve V6 featuring aluminum heads and could be paired with a five-speed manual transmission. Spec’d correctly, it was something of a stealthy weapon.


In fact, a manual transmission was available well into this millennium, with the sixth-gen Maxima able to be fitted with a hand shaker. Your author will cop to a certain affinity for that particular iteration of Maxima, by the way, despite the brand’s weirdo dalliance with that belt-buckle grille. This was the era of Maxima which came with a SkyView glass roof comprised of two fixed panels with ran the length, not width, of the car. Think of racing stripes on the roof made of glass and you’ve got the general idea. It was wonderfully weird. For a spell, the Maxima could even be fitted with two bucket-style seats bifurcated with a tall console in the rear passenger compartment, binning the traditional bench.

Recently, Nissan hasn’t paid much mind – or marketing – to the Maxima. Demand for this type of body style has surely waned in the last decade, with the majority of American rushing to SUVs and crossover-type vehicles. Year to date, for example, Nissan has moved 3,753 Maxima sedans compared to 87,675 Rogue crossovers. If you’re wondering, the company claims the Altima found 78,610 buyers.


Alert readers will note the Altima has grown in size to essentially usurp the Maxima, of course. Even if the exterior dimensions of the two brothers are not directly comparable, the practical space inside both vehicles is nearly identical. It’s been ages since the Max could genuinely represent itself as the 4DSC, so I’ll be pouring one out tonight for what I remember as the Maxima’s glory days.


[Photos: Nissan]


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  • Zarba Zarba 2 days ago

    When I bought my '01 Acura TL way back in the day, I had spent a few months searching for a Maxima with a manual, to no avail.


    I knew a few folks with Maximas from the early 90's, and all of them had issues with the automatic transmission. Can't comment on the manual since I couldn't ever find one.

    • See 1 previous
    • Jkross22 Jkross22 2 days ago

      By 2000, Nissan was dead to a lot of people.

  • DungBeetle62 DungBeetle62 2 days ago

    It was just getting sad watching Nissan try to reposition what we'd all remembered into a sort of Avalon to the Altima's Camry. Once they both had V6s and neither had a stick, the only real differentiation was in size.

  • Sgeffe Bronco looks with JLR “reliability!”What’s not to like?!
  • FreedMike Back in the '70s, the one thing keeping consumers from buying more Datsuns was styling - these guys were bringing over some of the ugliest product imaginable. Remember the F10? As hard as I try to blot that rolling aberration from my memory, it comes back. So the name change to Nissan made sense, and happened right as they started bringing over good-looking product (like the Maxima that will be featured in this series). They made a pretty clean break.
  • Flowerplough Liability - Autonomous vehicles must be programmed to make life-ending decisions, and who wants to risk that? Hit the moose or dive into the steep grassy ditch? Ram the sudden pile up that is occurring mere feet in front of the bumper or scan the oncoming lane and swing left? Ram the rogue machine that suddenly swung into my lane, head on, or hop up onto the sidewalk and maybe bump a pedestrian? With no driver involved, Ford/Volkswagen or GM or whomever will bear full responsibility and, in America, be ambulance-chaser sued into bankruptcy and extinction in well under a decade. Or maybe the yuge corporations will get special, good-faith, immunity laws, nation-wide? Yeah, that's the ticket.
  • FreedMike It's not that consumers wouldn't want this tech in theory - I think they would. Honestly, the idea of a car that can take over the truly tedious driving stuff that drives me bonkers - like sitting in traffic - appeals to me. But there's no way I'd put my property and my life in the hands of tech that's clearly not ready for prime time, and neither would the majority of other drivers. If they want this tech to sell, they need to get it right.
  • TitaniumZ Of course they are starting to "sour" on the idea. That's what happens when cars start to drive better than people. Humanpilots mostly suck and make bad decisions.
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