Housekeeping: We Want Your Feedback

housekeeping we want your feedback


Hey there! As you know, TTAC looks a bit different than it did last week. And operates a bit differently, as well.


Well, it's been a week now, and we'd like to hear feedback from you, the reader, on what is and what isn't working.


I have been monitoring the comments, and I've read your emails (and replied, if necessary. If I owe you a reply, feel free to ping me again). But it will be easier if we can round up feedback in the comments to this post.


Please keep your grievances realistic and focus on things that aren't working or we could easily change. Meaning complaints about user experience, or bugs, or functionality. Complaints about aesthetics are irrelevant to this conversation, as are complaints about topic mix or tone or the quality of our prose. Save those for another time.


We are aware of some things that aren't working or aren't working well, and those things will be fixed in short order.


Please keep in mind that the impetus behind the change wasn't just that the old site looked, well, old, but also that it was quite slow to load. It was like an '80s crapcan -- ran great for a long time but started looking dated and running slowly.


As our VP of Content, Colum Wood, puts it: "While the front end of the site may not look dramatically new, the back end changes are dramatic. As you may know, Google puts a lot of weight on site speed and a few other key metrics. Achieving those metrics is critical to having a high-ranking site and top-performing content. With the migration to this new platform we've been able to eliminate a lot of tech debt built up over years and score extremely highly in all key measured metrics from Google."


In other words, we'll be running more quickly once this is all sorted. That's good for you -- the site will load on your laptop, tablet, or phone more quickly. And it's good for us -- we'll traffic a bit better, and us writers and editors will be more productive when the site loads faster.


But as always when there is a major change, we've run into unanticipated challenges. Most of those should be handled this week.


That said, we also want to hear from you. Sound off below!


[Image: Sorn340 Studio Images/Shutterstock.com]


Become a TTAC insider. Get the latest news, features, TTAC takes, and everything else that gets to the truth about cars first by  subscribing to our newsletter.

Comments
Join the conversation
2 of 31 comments
  • Skippity Skippity 4 days ago

    Touching see more comments does nothing on my iPhone, Safari.

  • Xidex Xidex 3 days ago

    every time i go to the site it shuts down after a few seconds and goes to my home page. Upon the second time of loading TTAC it stays on the site. This happens every time. Never did that before but unsure if maybe its me?

  • Sgeffe Bronco looks with JLR “reliability!”What’s not to like?!
  • FreedMike Back in the '70s, the one thing keeping consumers from buying more Datsuns was styling - these guys were bringing over some of the ugliest product imaginable. Remember the F10? As hard as I try to blot that rolling aberration from my memory, it comes back. So the name change to Nissan made sense, and happened right as they started bringing over good-looking product (like the Maxima that will be featured in this series). They made a pretty clean break.
  • Flowerplough Liability - Autonomous vehicles must be programmed to make life-ending decisions, and who wants to risk that? Hit the moose or dive into the steep grassy ditch? Ram the sudden pile up that is occurring mere feet in front of the bumper or scan the oncoming lane and swing left? Ram the rogue machine that suddenly swung into my lane, head on, or hop up onto the sidewalk and maybe bump a pedestrian? With no driver involved, Ford/Volkswagen or GM or whomever will bear full responsibility and, in America, be ambulance-chaser sued into bankruptcy and extinction in well under a decade. Or maybe the yuge corporations will get special, good-faith, immunity laws, nation-wide? Yeah, that's the ticket.
  • FreedMike It's not that consumers wouldn't want this tech in theory - I think they would. Honestly, the idea of a car that can take over the truly tedious driving stuff that drives me bonkers - like sitting in traffic - appeals to me. But there's no way I'd put my property and my life in the hands of tech that's clearly not ready for prime time, and neither would the majority of other drivers. If they want this tech to sell, they need to get it right.
  • TitaniumZ Of course they are starting to "sour" on the idea. That's what happens when cars start to drive better than people. Humanpilots mostly suck and make bad decisions.
Next